ELD – News

Car haulers, this subject already sounds pretty familiar to every motor car carrier that’s thinking long term in the industry.

Here are some insights you need to know directly from FMCSA about the ELD rule:

ELD is used by commercial drivers with the requirement to prepare:

  1. HOS  – Hours of service
  2. RODS – Records of duty status

ELD will need to also be certified and registered with FMCSA, along with having supporting documents for drivers/car carriers required to keep in the truck.

So, beginning on December 18, 2017, a driver using an ELD must have an ELD information packet onboard the commercial motor vehicle (CMV).

Speaking about it, an ELD can be on a smartphone or other wireless device if the device meets the ELD rule’s technical specifications.

Data Storage:

For six months, a motor carrier must keep both the ELD Records of

  • hours services data
  • a back-up copy of that data on a separate device

The car carrier must ensure that these records are stored securely to protect driver privacy.

An ELD automatically records the following data elements at certain intervals:

  • date
  • time
  • location information
  • engine hours
  • vehicle miles
  • identification information for the driver
  • authenticated user
  • vehicle
  • motor carrier

Location data must be recorded by an ELD at 60-minute intervals when the vehicle is in motion, driver powers up and shuts down the engine, change duty status, and indicates personal use or yard moves.

Also, keep in mind that an ELD must automatically switch to driving mode once the commercial motor vehicle (CMV) is moving up to a set speed threshold of five miles per hour. As a result, the in-motion state must not be configured greater than five miles per hour. The vehicle will be considered stopped once its speed falls to zero miles per hour and stays at zero miles per hour for three consecutive seconds.

Guess what else?

The ELD must convert automatically captured vehicle position in latitude/longitude coordinates into geo-location information that indicates the approximate distance and direction to an identifiable location corresponding to the name of a nearby city, town, or village, with a State abbreviation.

Engine synchronization CMV – ELD

An ELD must be integrally synchronized with the engine of the commercial motor vehicle (CMV). Engine synchronization means monitoring engine operation to automatically capture the engine power status, vehicle motion status, miles driven, and engine hour

Vehicle performance? Not really.

Yes, the ELD rule allows but does not require, warning or notification to drivers when they are nearing their HOS limits.

Data export from ELD

Since all ELD data file output will be a standard comma-delimited file, a driver may import the data output file into Microsoft Excel, Word notepad, or other common tools. A driver will also be able to access ELD records through a screen display or a printout, depending on the ELD design.

Bluetooth Feature

If the driver is using a “local” ELD with Bluetooth capabilities, the authorized safety official will activate Bluetooth on his or her computing device and the driver will initiate the Bluetooth electronic transfer of the data from the driver’s ELD to the safety official’s computing device.

The official will provide a Bluetooth pairing code for the driver to enter into the ELD for the data file transfer.

Here’s a cool list you can review – ELD’s Compliant List

The plug-in device to your truck’s ECM communicates the relevant data to software on your smartphone — the software enables the log to work, likewise electronic pre-trip/post trip inspection reports.

The ECM plug-in communicates with your smartphone, as with many others, over Bluetooth, and guiding smartphone apps are currently available on both iOS and Android platforms. Administration of the data is done through a web-based software program users create a unique account.

Most ELDs pair an engine-connected relay with another device, often an operator’s smartphone or tablet, hence the common BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) designation.

For such devices, some contain a cellular connection within the engine-connected relay, some don’t.

For those that don’t, generally, extra costs incurred for data-plan charges on a smartphone are not reflected here.

Just a quick overview for car haulers:

We’re covering just new industry information so that every single car hauler out there can read it and get a general idea – for full in depth explanation of specific cases feel free to visit FMCSA for sure.

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Happy car hauling 

CarShipIO Team 

Until next time

 

ELD – Basics of Electronic Logging Device

In the auto transport industry, there’s been a lot of development and research in the transport industry about ELD.

ELD stands for Electronic Logging Device.

Take a look at more history insights about the ELD last years:

This means serious preparation as independent owner-operators is likely to gravitate to a baseline compliance device. They can benefit from additional functions such as IFTA data collection, making mileage tracking automatic and easily reportable.

The exceptions to ELD requirements will be the following:

  • Old model trucks (from 1999)
  • Drivers in drive-away businesses
  • Drivers operating under the timecard exception rule – short-haul 100 – 150 miles specifically.
  • Drivers who keep logbook but work less than 8 days in 30 days

The core basics of the display of an ELD are:

  • Driver First Name and Last Name
  • ELD Username
  • ELD Malfunction Status
  • Total Engine Hours
  • Miles for each driving period
  • Data Diagnostic Status for the authenticated driver

The specific data recorded is:

  • Date & Time
  • Location
  • Engine Hours & Vehicle Mileage
  • Speed & Distance
  • Driver Login
  • Vehicle Identification & Authorized Carrier Identification

All events are recorded:

  • At start & finish
  • When changing the duty status
  • Once per hour why vehicle is operating
  • At the start & end of personal use or yard time

On FMCSA if you search for more information you’ll clearly see this the Phase 3 – full compliance phase with the punch line that after December 16, 2019, all drivers and carriers subject to the rule must use certified, registered ELDs that comply with requirements of the ELD regulations. So after that FMCSA advice is to take advantage of their specific training like classrooms, webinars.

So far for general info of ELD – that’s it. We are always keeping an eye behind the curtains to see where the industry goes so we are going to keep everyone updated with our research.

 

As always happy car hauling and until next time.

CarShipIO Team